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gradireland Higher Education Awards

On Friday 22 November 2019, gradireland hosted the annual Higher Education Symposium & Awards at the Crowne Plaza Northwood Hotel in Santry, Dublin. This event, sponsored by the Novartis, MSD, Aldi, ESB, Jameson, Novartis and PwC, was attended by over 150 higher education professionals and stakeholders, making it one of our biggest Symposiums to-date. The Symposium was focused on discussing the future of Higher Education in Ireland, exploring current international best practice, Irish and international research findings and expert discussions. Following the Symposium, the winners of the Higher Education Awards were revealed at a gala ceremony.
This event, sponsored by the Novartis, MSD, Aldi, ESB, Jameson, Novartis and PwC, was attended by over 150 higher education professionals and stakeholders, making it one of our biggest Symposiums to-date.
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The symposium

The symposium commenced shortly after 10am with a welcome from gradireland Director Gavan O’Brien. The first presentation of the day was from Dr Denise Frawley , Head of Performance Evaluation at the Higher Education Authority who presented on the findings of the most recent HEA Graduate Outcomes Survey (Class of 2017) which surveyed nearly 30,000 graduates to understand what their next step was post-graduation.

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gradireland Higher Education Awards
gradireland Higher Education Awards

GAMSAT Exam and Graduate Entry Medicine Programmes in Ireland Fact Sheet

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Check out this clear, concise fact sheet from Maynooth University on both the GAMSAT exam and Graduate Entry Medicine Programmes in Ireland. Download it here: GAMSAT exam and Graduate Entry Medicine Programmes in Ireland

Sorcha Ní Ghallachóir, Múinteoir Meánscoile

6 reasons why research could be right for you

The supports available from the Irish Research Council mean that a career in research is rewarding, stimulating and engaging. Many highly qualified researchers apply each year, which means that the application and selection process is highly competitive, but why couldn’t you be one of them? Here are some of the reasons why people choose a career in research.
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A career in research broadens your mind: The research community is collaborative by nature, and by meeting and communicating with other researchers, you can gain a better understanding of the holistic benefits of research. In one sense, doing research expands your vision as well as your content-based knowledge. You are constantly confronted with problems and hypotheses that challenge you to question your assumptions and to produce new outputs.

six reasons why research could be right for you

Getting your research career started with the Irish Research Council

The Irish Research council funds all areas of research, getting the right supports behind you as you embark on this career is vital.
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The Council have a varied range of funding programmes in place to ensure you get your career in research in the best possible fashion. The programmes are competitive and each has strict entry criteria. The work that the IRC fund is based on the excellence of the proposed research, so all funding proposals should be compiled with this in mind.

Getting started in research

Did you know? Recent Irish achievements in research

One of the objectives of the Irish Research Council (IRC) is to create a culture of world class research for the benefit of the country as a whole. Let’s take a look at some of the most impressive work done by Irish researchers in 2017, which ranges from the mapping of stars to development of treatments for Parkinson’s disease.
Sustaining and indeed growing Ireland’s investment in individual researchers with creative, cutting edge ideas will pay serious dividends
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  • An international team of scientists was led by Dr Eamonn O’Gorman, an astronomer at the Dublin Institute of Advanced Studies, to produce the most detailed image of a star, other than our own Sun, to date.
  • Dr Aimee Stapleton, a researcher at the University of Limerick, discovered that electricity can be generated be applying pressure to the proteins found in both egg whites and tears.
Maria Velasco, Irish Research Council Scholar, 'The cerebellar network between neurons (red), astrocytes (yellow) and microglia (green) in a mouse organotypic slice culture'. Copyright Irish Research Council

How enterprise research programmes work with the Irish Research Council

The Irish Research Council offers two enterprise programmes specifically aimed at supporting the skills development of early stage researchers. Both programmes encourage exploration of a diverse range of possible career paths and cultivate independent thinking, while helping employers and other organisations access research talent.
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Both the Employment Based Postgraduate Programme (EBP) and the Enterprise Partnership Scheme (EPS) aim to provide early-stage researchers with both experience and financial backing, along with the cooperation and support of an organisation relevant to their field of research.

Irish Research Council Enterprise Programmes

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