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Computer Science - Research

Typically, a MSc takes two years to complete (three years if taken part-time); at the end of the first year the student may have the option to transfer to the PhD register if they so wish subject to satisfactory progress.

The aim of the Structured MSc in Computer Science is to provide the student with an opportunity to carry out a significant body of research work with support from the teaching component of the programme. The programme will offer academic subjects to enhance their knowledge as well as transferable and generic skills that will add significantly to the MSc experience by broadening the skill base of the candidate.

The first step is to identify a potential supervisor. This involves deciding on a general research area that you are interested in and to contact a member of the department's staff that is working in that area. The best approach is to look through the staff web pages and the list of Research Groups/Projects in the department.

Research postgraduates are typically (though not exclusively) funded during their research. Support varies depending on the source, but at best, funding can include payment of fees, a salary and travel expenses. Note that all funding programmes are highly competitive, and most are contingent on the applicant securing high marks in their primary degree.

Potential MSc students should decide on a general research area that they're interested in, and then contact a member of the department's staff that's working in that area. The best approach is to look through the staff web pages and the list of Research Groups/Projects in the department – these can be found at https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/computer-science/our-research

Research students can also register to work jointly with the Department of Computer Science and one of the following MU research institutes: National Centre for Geocomputation, An Foras Feasa, the Hamilton Institute and the Innovation Value Institute. Please see the entries for these institutes for more details of the research topics available.

The aim of the Structured PhD in Computer Science is to provide the student with an opportunity to carry out a significant body of research work with support from the teaching component of the programme. The programme will offer both academic modules to enhance the student's specialist knowledge, and transferable and generic skills modules. These modules will add significantly to the PhD experience by broadening the skill base of the candidate.

The first step to applying is to identify a potential supervisor; this involves deciding on a general research area that you are interested in and then contacting a member of the department's staff that is specialising in that area. More information on research in the department can be found at https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/computer-science/our-research.

Research postgraduates are typically (though not exclusively) funded during their research. Support varies depending on the source, but funding can include payment of fees, a salary and travel expenses. Please note that all funding programmes are highly competitive, and most are contingent on the applicant securing high marks in their primary degree.

Research students can also register to work jointly with the Department of Computer Science and one of the following Maynooth University research institutes: National Centre for Geocomputation, An Foras Feasa, the Hamilton Institute, the Callan Institute, and the Innovation Value Institute. Please see the entries for these institutes for more details of the research topics available.

The PhD consists of 30 credits minimum / 90 credits maximum in taught modules (15 must be in generic or transferable skills and 15 in subject-specific or advanced specialist advanced modules) with the remaining 270–330 credits being allocated to the research project and thesis.

Entry requirements

Applications are invited from students who have achieved high marks in their undergraduate degree. This is typically a first-class honours in Computer Science or a closely-related discipline, although students with a second class honours primary degree can also be considered.

Applicants must have a recognised primary degree which is considered equivalent to Irish university primary degree level.

Minimum English language requirements:
• IELTS: 6.5 minimum overall score
• TOEFL (Paper based test): 585
• TOEFL (Internet based test): 95
• PTE (Pearson): 62

Maynooth University's TOEFL code is 8850

Duration

MHG02 PhD 4 years Full-time
MHG03 PhD 6 years Part-time
MHG04 MSc by Research 2 years Full-time
MHG05 MSc by Research 3 years Part-time

Careers or further progression

On completing an MSc in Computer Science the graduate has a number of options open to them. They can continue to build their career as a researcher in academia or pursue a career in the technology industry.

On completing a PhD in Computer Science the graduate has a number of options open to them. They can continue to build their career as a researcher in academia, for example as a Post-Doctoral researcher, or in the technology industry. They will also be attractive as an educator in all facets of the Higher Education sector.

Other possibilities include working in scientific research administration or a hightech start-up environment. The experience and discipline gained from completing an MSc in Computer Science also can open other avenues outside of Computer Science where these skills are prized.

Further enquiries

Contact us about this course
Programme Director Mr John McDonald
Tel: +353 (0)1 708 3847
Fax: +353 (0)1 708 3848
Email: admin@cs.nuim.ie
Website: https://www.maynoothuniversity.ie/computer-science

Comment

The PhD consists of 30 credits minimum / 90 credits maximum in taught modules (15 must be in generic or transferable skills and 15 in subject-specific or advanced specialist advanced modules) with the remaining 270–330 credits being allocated to the research project and thesis.

Application date

All applications should be made through the PAC system.

Closing Date - Rolling Closing Date.

Research areas

Research strengths include geocomputation, computer vision, optical processing, dependable software systems, computational cognitive modelling, and software engineering.

Course fee

In general, there are two levels of fees payable. EU students from EU countries including Ireland pay a subsidised level of fees for both taught courses and research programmes. Tuition fees for students from outside the EU are not subsidised and are thus somewhat higher than for EU students.

Enrolment and start dates

Commences September (or other agreed time)

Remember to mention gradireland when contacting institutions!