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Celtic Studies / Léann Ceilteach - Structured

Course Overview
The Structured PhD in Celtic Studies is a four-year, full-time or six-year, part-time programme of study and research and applicants must have a high honours standard in their primary degree or present such other evidence of fitness as will satisfy the Head of Discipline and the College of Arts, Social Sciences and Celtic Studies.

As part of the doctoral training available on the Structured PhD programme, students avail themselves of a range of interdisciplinary taught modules. The wide menu of available options include modules that.

Are discipline-specific in that they augment the students' existing knowledge in their specialist area (e.g. in languages or literatures);

Are dissertation-specific in that they supply core skills which are essential to completion of the research project (e.g. in writing);

Support students' professional development (e.g. through presentation of a paper at an international conference);

Enhance students' employability through generic training (e.g. in computer-based skills).

Students will be assigned a primary Supervisor or Co-Supervisors, and a Graduate Research Committee made up of experienced researchers, to help plan their programme of study and to provide on-going support to their research.

Entry requirements

The minimum qualification is a primary degree in Irish, Celtic Studies, or similar, with a Second Class Honours, Grade 2 (or an equivalent international qualification). Many successful applicants will already hold a Master's degree.

Admission to the PhD is at the discretion of the potential supervisor and the Head of Discipline. Initial enquiries should be made to the Head of Discipline.

Duration

Structured PhD (full-time) GYG11

Further enquiries

Prof. Máirín Ní Dhonnchadha
T +353 91 493 010
E mairin.nidhonnchadha@nuigalway.ie

Research areas

Areas of interest
The PhD in Celtic Studies usually involves close study of Celtic languages and literatures (e.g., Irish, Welsh, Scottish Gaelic), but may encompass religion, history, archaeology, and the interface with the Latin and Germanic traditions of the Celtic-speaking regions. Doctoral research usually entails some degree of comparative work. The sources utilised tend to be medieval, but some topics may require the use of written sources of earlier or later date. For certain topics, knowledge of research methodologies other than those associated with Celtic Studies may have to be attained. The Structured PhD programme provides students with opportunities to acquire such training, and to learn non-Celtic languages (medieval and modern) that may be relevant to their research.

PhD students of Celtic Studies are usually supervised or co-supervised by scholars of Irish, Welsh, or Celtic (languages and literatures), but for some theses, supervisory expertise in archaeology, history, classical languages and literatures, or other disciplines may also be essential. The list of researcher profiles below is drawn from the disciplines of Archaeology, Classics, History, Old and Middle Irish, and Welsh.

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