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Irish Studies

Overview
The MA in Irish Studies is an interdisciplinary

Offer students a range of modules that will allow them to pursue challenging cross-disciplinary themes

Explore the possibilities and tensions in inter-disciplinary work

Introduce students to conceptual tools allowing them to explore, critically, aspects of Irish Studies

Assist students in developing focused research and the skills necessary to write academic papers

Course Structure
Course Details
The MA is arranged into a number of core and optional modules (courses).
All students take the following two core modules:
• 'Belfast: Place, Identity and Memory in a Contested City' - offering a unique introduction to Irish Studies through the study of Belfast - Ireland's second city and the capital of Northern Ireland – its history, culture and society, and relationship to the rest of the island and the wider world
• 'Making Knowledge Work' - a faculty-wide module exploring research practice and ethics, and interdisciplinary themes such as heritage, visual cultures and religious dialogue
• Irish Studies Dissertation - a 15,000 word piece of original research supervised by a specialist member of staff
Students choose four optional modules, under guidance from the programme director, from a list of those relevant to Irish Studies from across the faculty, and at least one research methods module. These currently include:
• Irish Poetry (English - ENG7305)
• Topics in Irish History (History - MHY7081)
• The Politics of Northern Ireland (Politics - PAI7021)
• Government and Institutions of Northern Ireland (Politics - PAI7002)
• Politics of the Republic of Ireland (Politics - PAI7022)
• MA Specialisation - Anthropology of Ireland (Anthropology - ANT7053)
• Conflict & Change in Northern Ireland (Sociology - SOC9062) and University Research and Civil Society (SOC9069)
• Literary Research Methods (English - ENG7163)
• Public History Internship (with placement in a museum/heritage centre in Northern Ireland) (History - MHY7077)
• Working with Archives (History - MHY7025)
• Becoming an Historian (History - MHY7020)
• Approaches to Research Design (Politics - PAI7001)
• Approaches to Social Research (Sociology - SOC9012)
• Advanced Anthropological Methods (Anthropology - ANT7007)
• Research Methods in Critical and Creative Practice (Creative Arts)

We anticipate that a new optional module in Irish Folklore Studies will also be available for 2018 entry.
Modules from other programmes may be selected with the approval of the programme director.
Some options may require that particular methods courses be taken or the student to have a particular academic background. The dissertation may be supervised by Institute staff or, subject to the agreement of the Head of School, by members of co-operating academic departments.
For detailed programme information please see the Irish Studies Gateway section on the School website.

Entry requirements

Entrance requirements
Graduate
Normally a 2.1 Honours degree in a relevant subject with evidence of study of Ireland, or equivalent qualification acceptable to the University.

Applicants who hold a 2.2 Honours degree in a relevant subject with evidence of study of Ireland or equivalent qualification acceptable to the University, who can also demonstrate relevant professional experience will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

The University's Recognition of Prior Learning Policy provides guidance on the assessment of experiential learning (RPEL).

Please visit http://go.qub.ac.uk/RPLpolicy for more information.

Applicants may be required to submit a piece of written work in support of their application.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
For information on international qualification equivalents, please check the specific information for your country.

English Language Requirements
Evidence of an IELTS* score of 6.5, with not less than 5.5 in any component, or an equivalent qualification acceptable to the University is required. *Taken within the last 2 years.

International students wishing to apply to Queen's University Belfast (and for whom English is not their first language), must be able to demonstrate their proficiency in English in order to benefit fully from their course of study or research. Non-EEA nationals must also satisfy UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI) immigration requirements for English language for visa purposes.

For more information on English Language requirements for EEA and non-EEA nationals see: www.qub.ac.uk/EnglishLanguageReqs.

If you need to improve your English language skills before you enter this degree programme, INTO Queen's University Belfast offers a range of English language courses. These intensive and flexible courses are designed to improve your English ability for admission to this degree.
•Academic English: an intensive English language and study skills course for successful university study at degree level
•Pre-sessional English: a short intensive academic English course for students starting a degree programme at Queen's University Belfast and who need to improve their English.

Duration

1 year full-time or 3 years part-time.

Learning and Teaching
Morning and afternoon classes

Careers or further progression

Career Prospects
Introduction
Students of the Institute of Irish Studies go on to pursue careers not only as scholars, but also in a wide range of occupations, including the media, in the heritage sector, public administration and in business.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

Queen's postgraduates reap exceptional benefits. Unique initiatives, such as Degree Plus and Researcher Plus bolster our commitment to employability, while innovative leadership and executive programmes alongside sterling integration with business experts helps our students gain key leadership positions both nationally and internationally.

http://www.qub.ac.uk/directorates/sgc/careers/

Further enquiries

Professor Peter Gray, Professor
School of History, Anthropology, Philosophy and Politics - Professor History
email: p.h.gray@qub.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0)28 9097 3433, +44 (0)28 9097 5226

Subjects taught

The MA is arranged into thematically-focused groups of modules to include culture, art and literature, political identity, conflict, politics and human rights. Students will take a number of compulsory and optional modules. One of the modules in the first semester must be a research methods course.

Some options may require that particular methods courses be taken or the student to have a particular academic background. The dissertation may be supervised by Institute staff or, subject to the agreement of the Head of School, by members of co-operating academic departments.

A wide variety of modules is available, arranged in thematic and conceptual groups. Current thematic areas include:
• Ireland: Communities, Identities and Conflict
• Ireland: Culture, Tradition and Heritage
• Ireland: History and Politics
• Ireland: Literature, Language and Art
• Ireland: Peoples and Place

For detailed programme information please see the Irish Studies Gateway section on the School website.

Comment

Irish Studies highlights
Student Experience
•The Institute is the oldest centre for Irish Studies research in the world, and has strong links with Irish Studies centres and programmes in Ireland, the UK, Europe, the USA, Canada and Australasia. There are more than 70 teaching and research staff in the university who specialise in Irish Studies related subjects. The Institute hosts a lively research culture featuring regular seminars, conferences, workshops and reading groups in which postgraduates are encouraged to participate. Queen's has world-class resources for research in Irish Studies research and collaborates closely with many partner institutions and organisations in Northern Ireland.

Assessment method

Taught modules are usually assessed by a combination of written assignments and class participation. Students who have reached a pass in these will submit a dissertation (not exceeding 15,000 words).

A combination of written assignments and class participation. Students who have reached a pass in these will submit a dissertation (not exceeding 15,000 words).

Written language assignments

Creative practice

Dissertation (not exceeding 15,000 words) or practice as research project, which will include a critical reflection of approximately 3,500 words

Application date

Postgraduate Taught
Closing dates do apply for some of our courses, and details of these are available on our Course Finder. We advise you to apply as early as possible, particularly for those courses where there is a high demand for places. Early application is also important for international applicants to allow sufficient time to obtain a student entry visa.

How to Apply
Apply using our online Postgraduate Applications Portal go.qub.ac.uk/pgapply and follow the step-by-step instructions on how to apply. See application weblink below.

Enrolment and start dates

Entry year: 2018

Remember to mention gradireland when contacting institutions!