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The Irish Revolution 1912 - 1923

The aim of the course is to introduce students to, familiarise them with, and inculcate an advanced understanding of, the events of, sources for the study of, lines of historiographical enquiry relating to, and social memory and commemoration of, the revolutionary decade in modern Irish history from the start of the crisis over the third home rule bill in 1912 to the conclusion of the Irish civil war in 1923.

Upon completion of the course students should be able to:

- evaluate the significance of the principal issues and problems of the ‘revolutionary decade’ in modern Irish history, 1912-23

- summarise the competing interpretations of the significance of the events of the ‘revolutionary decade’

- compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of public and academic histories of the ‘revolutionary decade’

- evaluate and incorporate new insights informed by the forefront of the field of learning;

- judge the value of the source material available for the study of this period

- assess the contribution of the work of specific historians to our understating of the ‘revolutionary decade’

Entry requirements

The entry requirement is a primary degree with a Second Class Honours Grade 1 (or equivalent) in History or a cognate discipline.

Candidates who hold a primary degree with a Second Class Honours Grade 2 in History or a cognate discipline will also be considered subject to a written expression of interest and/or interview consistent with the school selection procedures.

In exceptional circumstances, substantial professional experience in a relevant and related field of employment (such as, but not restricted to, teaching, archives, museums, the heritage or tourism industries), that equip the candidate with the knowledge, skills and attributes required to undertake an MA programme, may be accepted as compensating for the absence of an undergraduate degree to the required standard. All such applications to be considered on a case by case basis by the programme co-ordinator and would be subject to the approval of the College of Arts, Celtic Studies and Social Science.

If you are applying with Qualifications obtained outside Ireland and you wish to verify if you meet the minimum academic and English language requirements for this programme please see course webpage (link below) to view the grades comparison table by country and for details of recognised English language tests.

Duration

1 Year full-time
2 Years Part Time (weekday working hrs)

Careers or further progression

Graduates of the course will be well-placed, either to continue to continue with further study of the period (the course serving as an ideal preparation for doctoral-level research), or to apply for the numerous jobs relating to the revolutionary decade that will arise in heritage, media, research and tourism areas, as a result of the heightened interest in the period produced by their centenaries.

Further enquiries

Programme Coordinator
Gabriel Doherty,
School of History,
University College Cork,
Email: g.doherty@ucc.ie;
Tel. 00 353 21 4902783

School Administrators
Deirdre O'Sullivan/Geraldine McAllister,
School of History
University College Cork
+353 (0)21 4902755 deirdre@ucc.ie

Subjects taught

The first module, Sources and debates in the Irish revolution, will examine contemporary writings, speeches and debates of the revolutionary period, with the attention on such figures as Padraig Pearse, James Connolly, Edward Carson, James Craig, David Lloyd George, Arthur Griffith, Terence MacSwiney, Constance Markiewicz, and many others. Students will also be introduced to the source material available for the study of the period, in both manuscript and on-line form, such as government archives, newspapers, IRA pension applications, Bureau of Military History testimonies, police records, and the like.The second module, Historiography of the Irish revolution, examines the arguments and interpretation of the events by historians from the 1920s to the present day.

The final module, Public history, Commemoration, and the Irish Revolution, focuses on the role of ‘public history’, that is, the use of the events of this ‘revolutionary decade’ by politicians and other groups and individuals to promote contemporary agendas.

The research module gives candidates the opportunity to explore in depth the subject matter of their proposal.

Students take modules to the value of 90 credits comprising taught modules to the value of 45 credits (Part I) and a dissertation to the value of 45 credits (Part II).

Students take 90 credits as follows:

Part I
HI6042 Sources and debates in the Irish revolution (15 credits);
HI6049 Historiography of the Irish revolution (15 credits)
HI6050 Public history, commemoration, and the Irish revolution (15 credits)

Part II
HI6100 History Dissertation (45 credits)
A dissertation of a maximum of 20,000 words must be submitted by a specified date in September.

Comment

Course Practicalities
The course is a full-time one, and delivered using a variety of teaching methods. The principal mechanism will be by means of seminar discussions, but there will also be opportunities for students to present their research findings, together with field trips to some of the sites in Cork city and county associated with the revolutionary period, including places such as Kilmichael, Crossbarry and Béal na mBláth.

There will be a mixture of lectures and seminars, averaging 4-5 class hours a week, plus individual tutorial discussions. In HI6042 there is also the week-long field trip (5 days, 4 nights away).

Assessment method

The programme utilises a variety of continuous assessment methods, including essays, book reviews and the analysis of document, artefacts, and televisual and cinematic productions. There are no written examinations.

Application date

Applications for 2017-18 intake are now open.

While UCC operates a rounds system for Postgraduate Taught courses (detailed below) we would advise you to apply as soon as possible.

Deadline for receipt of Applications: Offers will be made:

For all completed applications received by January 16th 2017 Offers will be made by January 30th 2017

For all completed applications received by March 1st 2017 Offers will be made by March 15th 2017

For all completed applications received by May 1st 2017 Offers will be made by May 15th 2017

For all completed applications received by July 3rd 2017 Offers will be made by July 17th 2017

Late applications may be accepted on a first-come, first-served basis for any courses that have remaining capacity for places.

Non-EU Applicants:

Please visit the following page for further information for Non EU applicants http://www.ucc.ie/en/international/studyatucc/postgraduateprogrammes/tau...

Course fee

2017/2018 Irish/EU Fee: €6,000 full-time; €3,000 per year part-time

Enrolment and start dates

Next Intake: 11 September 2017

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