Top

Journalism

Media and publishing careers for graduates: journalism.

Journalism includes newspapers, magazines, and online content (the internet has proved itself a serious medium for journalism, with many stories now being broken online). The industry is very different to journalism a decade ago. This change is advantageous to those now entering the industry, as they are likely to be very technologically savvy, in comparison with many more experienced journalists who would have started on typewriters and might not be as comfortable with computers and the internet.

Newspaper journalism is fairly structured as a career, with established salary scales and employment prospects. Working hours and travel will very much depend on the area covered but, apart from the constant battle with deadlines, it is possible to achieve a comfortable level of career stability. For print media, many graduates can proceed straight from a journalism course into their first job, provided they can produce examples of top quality work.

Journalism is obviously helped by qualifications but an ability to work as a freelance journalist producing high-quality, regular fare can get you places quicker.

Journalism in magazines and periodicals differs from newspaper journalism in that deadlines are less immediate and the journalist will be writing for a narrower audience (business, professional or consumer), which can become very narrow indeed. There are a myriad of publications catering to niche markets (specialist consumer), which can seem quite obscure to outsiders. Obviously, the type of magazine will depend on the journalist’s own interests. Magazine journalists can contribute as a member of staff for a publication or work in a freelance capacity. Working on the staff of a magazine either falls under the category of writing or editing, although small publications may blur these boundaries.